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Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Career on Pharmacy in usa

Pharmacists are health professionals who practices in pharmacy, the field of health science focusing on safe and effective medicine use. Pharmacists dispense prescription medication to patients and provide drugs information.
Traditionally a qualification in Pharmacy was associated with a lifetime career as alchemist. Knowledge and training in Pharmaceutics offers a wide array of career options to the students. The programme is no longer confined to the laboratories or classrooms and goes beyond the curriculum. The career options after the programme are also immense.

To become a licensed pharmacist, you must meet the requirements of the state or jurisdiction in which you are seeking licensure. In most states, some examinations and other qualifications are prerequisites for licensure. You must contact the board of pharmacy of the state in which you wish to practice for their specific licensure requirements.

The North American Pharmacist Licensure Examination (NAPLEX) is required in all U.S. jurisdictions except California, which administers its own examination. NAPLEX, which is developed by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP), is a computer-adaptive test that assesses the candidate's ability to apply knowledge gained in pharmacy school to practice situations.
The NAPLEX is a four-hour and fifteen-minute examination that consists of 185 five-option multiple-choice test questions. A majority of the questions on the NAPLEX are asked in a scenario-based format (i.e., patient profiles with accompanying test questions).

Most states require a drug law examination as a condition of licensure. The Multistate Pharmacy Jurisprudence Examination (MPJE) is currently administered in many states and is based on a nationally uniform content blueprint, with questions that are tailored to assess the pharmacy jurisprudence requirements of individual states.
In cooperation with participating state boards of pharmacy, the MPJE is uniformly developed, administered, and scored under policies and procedures developed by NABP's Advisory Committee on Examinations and approved by NABP's Executive Committee.

Practice Examinations
Some states require candidates for licensure to pass a laboratory or practice examination to ensure that candidates can accurately and safely prepare and dispense medications.

All state boards of pharmacy require candidates to complete an internship or externship before licensure. Such practice experience usually consists of 1,500 hours of experience that are gained during pharmacy school (beginning after the first year of training). Some states require that internship hours be gained solely after graduation from pharmacy school and before licensure. The internship process is subject to state board of pharmacy regulations. Each intern, internship site, and preceptor must register with the state board of pharmacy to have the hours counted toward licensure.

FPGEC Certification
NABP provides the FPGEC Certification program as a means of documenting the educational equivalency of a candidate's foreign pharmacy education, as well as the license and/or registration. In the process of FPGEC Certification, candidates provide documents that verify their educational backgrounds and licensure and/or registration.
The pharmacy program that each candidate completed must have been at least a four-year curriculum at the time of graduation. Beginning January 1, 2003, foreign-educated pharmacists will be required to have earned their professional degree from a five-year curriculum program in order to apply for FPGEC Certification. The program change affects only those foreign-educated pharmacists who have earned a pharmacy degree after January 1, 2003. These pharmacists must have graduated from a five-year degree program. The new curriculum requirements do not apply to foreign-educated pharmacists who have earned a four-year degree prior to January 1, 2003. These individuals will remain eligible for the FPGEC Certification under the current program requirements.

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